Last Minute Tips to Spookify Your Halloween

Exams are coming up and so is Halloween, so give yourself a break from all that studying and go celebrate this spooky holiday! But if you are like me and left all your Halloween celebration planning to the last minute, please look through these few tips to still have an extra spooky time this year. Obviously, I geared it to us students, as you might like to celebrate Halloween as cheap as possible.

  1. Decoration:

If your roomPost4.1.JPG looks like a small 4×4 box or if you enjoy the luxury of a slightly larger room in Rotterdam, you easily get into the spooky mood by hanging up a few decorations. You could be very creative and start some DIY projects to help liven up your space. Good places to find ideas for these kinds of activities are Pinterest and YouTube tutorials.

I am lazy about these kinds of things and I am also not creative at all. For the internationals out there, you must understand that Halloween is not a Dutch holiday, but to keep up with the game, the Netherlands has “Americanized” in this area and loads of different stores sell an array of Halloween decorations. I, for example, picked up some bunting and a few pompons to hang in my empty hallway for only three euros. Stores like Hema, Xenos and Action carry a lot of fun decoration ideas for a very cheap price.

 

  1. Costumes

Picking and choosing the perfect costume is one of the most important and stressful parts of Halloween, that is if you choose to dress up of course (but why not, seriously?). If you left it a little late and only now are discovering that you still need a costume for an event, then take a look around your room. You probably have some black clothes and ketchup lying around the house, which you could get very creative with. My go-to costume is as Hermione from Harry Potter; I have loads of Hogwarts/Gryffindor t-shirts, a wand and huge hair. Also, a good tip that I discovered is: never underestimate an old sheet. With a large piece of white fabric, or any other color for that matter, you can make a number of different costumes. Throw it over yourself and you are the ever-classic ghost and if you tie it around yourself in the right places, you will have a toga and look like a Greek god or goddess. Lastly you could also rip the sheet into long strips and make a mummy out of yourself. Add fake blood, ketchup or coffee stains to any costume you come up with, it will make it gory very quickly.

Post4.2.jpg

 

  1. Parties

After all this preparation, it is time for the big night, the main event. There are loads of different Halloween parties all across Rotterdam which you could “zombie walk” your way into. If you are not a fan of big parties, then throwing your own party is very easy. Invite some friends over (this works better if your room is not a 4×4 box), get a bag chips out and put on a scary horror movie. If you want to be a bit more creative with your snacks, try cutting anything you buy or bake into a pumpkin shape. If you want to keep an extra low budget and you don’t want to pay for a movie (don’t stream illegally!) then just steal your housemate’s Netflix password, if you  did not already…

For the party animals among us, there are loads of different parties being hosted on and around Halloween night. All of these can be found on Facebook, under events.

  • Tonight (Friday 28th of October) there is the Glow in the Dark: Halloween Edition at Maassilo. You must buy a ticket to get in, so act fast!
  • On Saturday night, the 29th of October, the Zombie Walk After Party is held at Rotown. The theme of this thriller night is dead celebrities, so whip out your best MJ moonwalk, but make it spooky!
  • On All Hallows’ Eve itself (31st of October) there is another spooky, scary party at Toffler hosted by Erasmus Rotterdam. To get in cheaply you just have to write your name on the event’s Facebook wall.
  • If lastly, you still haven’t had enough of Halloween ESN and ERF are hosting a party on November 1st at Plan C. This party is even more fun if you do not have an exam the following day.

I hope these tips have helped you out and given you some last minute inspiration to make this Halloween your best one yet. So go out and make some lasting, scary memories!

 

Happy Halloween!!!

 

How to survive statistics – 5 tips

Statistics: some of us love it, most of us don’t. But don’t worry, because in light of yesterday’s National Statistics Day (yes, there’s a special r9btmdrday for everything), I will share 5 tips with you on how to survive statistics. These tips will help you ace that Quantitative Methods exam or, for first years, start the Introduction to Statistical Analysis course prepared! I myself am a first year student at IBCoM, and therefore don’t really have any advice yet. So I asked professor R.S. Jacobs and some of my IBCoMagazine members to help us all out. With these tips you will hopefully 1) get a laugh, and 2) be more confident when tackling your Statistics course.

Here we go…!

1. Details matter
Details, details, details. Decimal places are the single most important things in the world; more important than Netflix. Remember to check the little things, as they play a huge role in determining your grade! (Professor R. S. Jacobs)

2. Make it relevant
When tackling statistics, think of how you can benefit from it in real life. The course is meant to serve as a tool to help us further on, so try to look past the numbers and think of how it might actually be useful to you. For example when going to a casino, or when you want to calculate the chance of you passing the tests! (Sophie Defaix, BA-3)

3. SPSS is your friendnormal-paranormal-distribution-white
Think of SPSS as your friend. Your smart but incredibly neurotic friend who is super-picky about what you two talk about, and who only answers in vast, incomprehensible tables of numbers. (Professor R. S. Jacobs)

4. Study together
With statistics, it’s not about learning facts by heart; it’s about understanding what you need to do and why. When you study together with friends, you can help each other understand what you don’t get, as well as increase your understanding of the things you do get by explaining them to others. Also, chocolate and tea help, but that counts for every course. (Yanniek van Dooren, BA-3)

5. Don’t panic
Lastly, don’t panic! You always have time to double-check your results and analyses. Just breathe in and out and take a second look, then you’ll do just fine. (Professor R. S. Jacobs)

I hope you enjoyed reading these tips and got something from them! If you have any useful tips that have not been mentioned yet, feel free to leave a reply to help each other out. Good luck everyone!

– Nikki

Humans of IBCoM: Floriane’s story

You probably know about the huge phenomenon of the Humans of New York Facebook page. This page, which interviews real-life New Yorkers on the streets, has gone viral over the Internet and is being replicated in all different cities across the world. IBCoMagazine has taken over the same concept, and we’re telling the stories of our fellow IBCoM students.

thumbnail_dscf0328

Sticking to the What’s New theme, the first Human of IBCoM of the year is a first year student: Floriane van Alphen. She moved here from Switzerland and this is her story.

 

Why did you decide to come here?

“My mom is German, but my dad is Dutch and I’ve lived in Switzerland for 12 years. As I went to an International School, all my friends were from different places and they wanted to go to university in places outside of our country. A lot of them were interested in England, America, etc. These options were also open for me and my parents were supportive of me as they said: ‘Go wherever is best for you. If it’s feasible, we’ll allow you to go there.’ But I wanted to go to Holland, because I always say I’m Dutch, but I’ve hardly lived here. I only lived here for 4 years when I was younger. So honestly, for me it’s much more than just the university or the course, which I really enjoy too. A big part of coming here was returning to and experiencing where I’m from again. So then I could understand what I’m identifying myself as.”

 

How do you like living here in Rotterdam so far?

“I think Rotterdam is very different from where I lived in Switzerland, because it was a city but a very small city. I wouldn’t go as far as calling Rotterdam a metropolitan city, but it was a change from what I was used to. And I think that the Dutch people are really sweet. They are so welcoming and so interested in where I’m from, which is really motivating for someone very new here.”

 

Do you think your international experiences have helped you settle into IBCoM?

“Yeah, for sure, I’m really happy about the position that I’m in. I can identify equally with Dutch people as I can with the Internationals. Sometimes, people who have come from abroad can more easily identify with peers in similar situations as them, which isn’t meant in a bad way. The internationals identify with the internationals and the Dutch identify with the Dutch. Obviously there is interplay between the two and luckily everyone gets along, but I think that there is still some consciousness of where the person you meet is coming from.”

 

Even though we are both first years, how do you feel about studying abroad?

“Oh, I’m so excited already! I don’t want to go to America, I don’t know exactly why, but it seems like a cliché. My dream is to go to Australia though, not that that isn’t a cliché, but it seems like an amazing country and an awesome place to live and study, of course.”

 

What new things have you come across when living here in the Netherlands?

“The weather is crazy! I have visited the Netherlands often with my family, but never for really long. Now living here I can’t believe how weird and unpredictable Dutch weather can be! At the beginning of the school year, we had crazy temperatures and these continued until like a week ago. Now in one day it can be cold and rainy, hot and sweaty all at the same time. I never expected that, as I’m still getting used to bringing my umbrella with me!”

This was Floriane’s story about her experiences so far. Look out for more Humans of IBCoM on the blog and even in the magazine’s issues throughout the year!